18 jun. 2019

The Waterboys - Where The Action Is




LOS COAST - SAMSARA



https://www.loscoast.com/
On their eagerly awaited debut album Samsara, the visionary Austin, TX combo Los Coast delivers a fresh blast of punchy psychedelic-pop-soul that effortlessly incorporates a wide range of genres. The band's seamlessly soulful songcraft incorporates the band's distinctive grooves along with the inventive compositions and commanding vocals of principal members Trey Privott (lead vocals, guitar) and John Courtney (guitar, keyboards, vocals).
Even before Samsara had been recorded, Los Coast had already earned a reputation as one of Austin’s most exciting and inventive young bands. With its lineup rounded out by Megan Hartman on bass, Damien Llanes on drums and Natalie Wright on keys, plus a varied assortment of guest players, Los Coast was already renowned for its rousing, expansive live sets.
That same mix of energy and expertise is reflected on Samsara, which features such memorable, no-nonsense tunes as "Simplify," "Monsters," "Graves" and the frantic, tongue-twisting "(Everything But) The Kitchen Sink." The album delivers infectious hooks, ironic lyrical twists and explosive funk grooves in equal measure, providing an irresistible frame for Privott's soulful vocals and the band's explosive grooves.
"We love pop music, but we also love to experiment," says Courtney. "We try to avoid letting the listener know what's coming, and we like playing with people's expectations and catching the listener off guard.  It becomes stale if it's too familiar, so we like to come up with music that's familiar and surprising at the same time."
"We're lucky to be able to explore these different sounds and different attitudes, and do a little dabbling," adds Privott. "We started with a blank canOn their eagerly awaited debut album Samsara, the visionary Austin, TX combo Los Coast delivers a fresh blast of punchy psychedelic-pop-soul that effortlessly incorporates a wide range of genres. The band's seamlessly soulful songcraft incorporates the band's distinctive grooves along with the inventive compositions and commanding vocals of principal members Trey Privott (lead vocals, guitar) and John Courtney (guitar, keyboards, vocals). Even befoe Samsara had been recorded, Los Coast had already earned a reputation as one of Austin’s most exciting and inventive young bands. With its lineup rounded out by Megan Hartman on bass, Damien Llanes on drums and Natalie Wright on keys, plus a varied assortment of guest players, Los Coast was already renowned for its rousing, expansive live sets. That same mix of energy and expertise is reflected on Samsara, which features such memorable, no-nonsense tunes as "Simplify," "Monsters," "Graves" and the frantic, tongue-twisting "(Everything But) The Kitchen Sink." The album delivers infectious hooks, ironic lyrical twists and explosive funk grooves in equal measure, providing an irresistible frame for Privott's soulful vocals and the band's explosive grooves. "We love pop music, but we also love to experiment," says Courtney. "We try to avoid letting the listener know what's coming, and we like playing with people's expectations and catching the listener off guard. It becomes stale if it's too familiar, so we like to come up with music that's familiar and surprising at the same time." "We're lucky to be able to explore these different sounds and different attitudes, and do a little dabbling," adds Privott. "We started with a blank canvas, and we built a diverse color palette around the album that we wanted to create. It felt like everything was fair game, from psychedelic funk to the blues to acoustic singer-songwriter pop." "I think this album captures a moment in time for the band, and a moment of time in Austin too, with certain things that were in the air at the time, and certain tides turning," Courtney offers. Georgia-born Privott's first love was jazz—thanks to the influence of his uncle, noted guitarist and former Late Night with David Letterman band member Hiram Bullock—but his musical consciousness soon came to embrace gospel and soul, thanks to his family's Southern Baptist faith, as well as punk rock, folk and hip-hop. He began picking up various instruments in his early teens, and began experimenting with recording soon after. Although Texas native Courtney focuses on lead guitar with Los Coast, he's a versatile multi-instrumentalist whose sensibility was influenced by his extensive studies at the prestigious Berkley College of Music. "I see us as a rock and roll band with a lot of soul influences, like Sam Cooke and Otis Redding," Privott states. "Otis was from Georgia, Little Richard, too, and that music is in my blood. What I think makes Los Coast stand out is that we’re psychedelic. As a guitar player, John Courtney is into guys like Jerry Garcia and he’s also jazz-trained. His playing defines the band just as much as my voice does." Trey and John hooked up in Austin in 2015, and quickly won an audience in their adopted hometown, thanks to a long-running weekly residency at the Austin club C-Boy's. "We had wanted to use the residency as a chance to get comfortable onstage, and to really learn to play as a group," Trey explains. "But more and more people started showing up, which we hadn't expected at all." A high-profile gig at 2016's Austin City Limits festival helped to spread the band's reputation beyond its hometown, as did some out-of-town touring that helped to build demand for Los Coast's long-simmering debut album, elevating the group to official buzz-band status. The band's memorable first indie single, "Summer Samaritan," gave way to the indelible gospel-funk of its followup "Simplify," which now serves as a key track on Samsara. "We reworked the album multiple times because we wanted to get it right," Courtney admits. "We were being a little perfectionist, but we finally got to the point where we felt good about it. It was a long process, but it was time well spent." "We built the sessions from the ground up," adds Privott. "It was kind of a non-traditional way to make an album, to work on it for so long. We went moment by moment, instrument by instrument, and we used everything we had to work with. That seemed to work for us. Now we're looking forward to sharing it with the world."vas, and we built a diverse color palette around the album that we wanted to create. It felt like everything was fair game, from psychedelic funk to the blues to acoustic singer-songwriter pop."
"I think this album captures a moment in time for the band, and a moment of time in Austin too, with certain things that were in the air at the time, and certain tides turning," Courtney offers.
Georgia-born Privott's first love was jazz—thanks to the influence of his uncle, noted guitarist and former Late Night with David Letterman band member Hiram Bullock—but his musical consciousness soon came to embrace gospel and soul, thanks to his family's Southern Baptist faith, as well as punk rock, folk and hip-hop. He began picking up various instruments in his early teens, and began experimenting with recording soon after. Although Texas native Courtney focuses on lead guitar with Los Coast, he's a versatile multi-instrumentalist whose sensibility was influenced by his extensive studies at the prestigious Berkley College of Music.
"I see us as a rock and roll band with a lot of soul influences, like Sam Cooke and Otis Redding," Privott states. "Otis was from Georgia, Little Richard, too, and that music is in my blood. What I think makes Los Coast stand out is that we’re psychedelic. As a guitar player, John Courtney is into guys like Jerry Garcia and he’s also jazz-trained. His playing defines the band just as much as my voice does."
Trey and John hooked up in Austin in 2015, and quickly won an audience in their adopted hometown, thanks to a long-running weekly residency at the Austin club C-Boy's. "We had wanted to use the residency as a chance to get comfortable onstage, and to really learn to play as a group," Trey explains. "But more and more people started showing up, which we hadn't expected at all."
A high-profile gig at 2016's Austin City Limits festival helped to spread the band's reputation beyond its hometown, as did some out-of-town touring that helped to build demand for Los Coast's long-simmering debut album, elevating the group to official buzz-band status. The band's memorable first indie single, "Summer Samaritan," gave way to the indelible gospel-funk of its followup "Simplify," which now serves as a key track on Samsara.
"We reworked the album multiple times because we wanted to get it right," Courtney admits. "We were being a little perfectionist, but we finally got to the point where we felt good about it. It was a long process, but it was time well spent."
"We built the sessions from the ground up," adds Privott. "It was kind of a non-traditional way to make an album, to work on it for so long.  We went moment by moment, instrument by instrument, and we used everything we had to work with. That seemed to work for us. Now we're looking forward to sharing it with the world."

11 jun. 2019

Dr. John









https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._John

Dr. John

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Malcom John Rebennack Jr. (Nueva OrleansLuisiana20 de noviembre de 1940-ib.6 de junio de 2019),1​ más conocido por su nombre artístico Dr. John, o también Dr. John Creaux, fue un pianistacantante y compositor estadounidense cuya música combinaba los géneros del bluesboogie-woogie y el rock and roll.
Activo como músico de sesión desde fines de los años 1950 hasta su muerte, ganando en los siguientes años de 1960 después de la liberación de su albúm Gris-Gris en el Bath Festival de Blues y Música Progresiva. Se presentó en un animado espectáculo inspirado en la medicina. Las costumbres de Mardi Gras y ceremonias de vudú. Rebennack grabó 32 álbumes de estudio y seis álbumes en vivo, y también contribuyó con otros cientos de músicos en sus grabaciones. En 1973 tuvo un Top 10 con el sencillo Right Place, Wrong Time.
Ganador de seis Premios Grammy. Rebennack fue inducido al Salón de la Fama del Rock and Roll por el cantante John Legend en marzo del 2011. En mayo de 2013, Rebennack recibió un doctorado honorario de las bellas artes de la Universidad de Tulane.

ografía[editar]

Infancia y raíces musicales[editar]

Su carrera musical comenzó en su ciudad natal a comienzos de los años 1950. En un principio, se concentró en la guitarra, ofreciendo conciertos con bandas locales bajo el nombre de Mac Rebbennack and the Skyliners, Frankie Ford and the Thunderbirds y Jerry Byrnes and the Loafers. Dr. John obtuvo cierto éxito a nivel local con el tema Storm Warning, publicado en Rex Records en 1959 e influido por Bo Diddley.
La carrera de Rebennack como guitarrista se truncó cuando su dedo anular fue herido en un disparo mientras defendía al teclista y cantante Ronnie Barron, compañero de grupo y amigo de la escuela. Tras la lesión, Rebennack se concentró en el bajo antes de hacer del piano su instrumento principal. Entre las influencias musicales de Rebennack en el piano se encontraba Professor Longhair.
En 1963, Rebennack se trasladó a Los Ángeles, donde respaldó como músico de sesión a artistas de la talla de Sonny & Cher o Canned Heat, integrado en el selecto grupo conocido como The Wrecking Crew.

1968-1970: Dr. John the Night Tripper[editar]

Rebennack adquirió fama a finales de los años 1960 y comienzos de los 1970 con música que combinaba el R&B de Nueva Orleans con el rock psicodélico y elaborados conciertos que se acercaban a ceremonias religiosas de vudú, incluyendo elaborados trajes y peinados. Durante la época, Rebennack adquirió el mote de Dr. John, The Night Tripper, procedente de una médico vudú de Luisiana de comienzos de 1800.
Gris-Gris, su álbum debut de 1968, combinaba cánticos y ritmos vudús con la tradición musical de Nueva Orleans, y fue situado en el puesto 143 de los 500 mejores álbumes de todos los tiempos en la revista musical Rolling Stone. Otros tres trabajos de estudio, BabylonRemedies y The Sun, Moon and Herbs, fueron publicados en el mismo sentido de Gris-Gris, si bien ninguno obtuvo la popularidad del primero.
A comienzos de 1969, Dr. John ofreció extensos conciertos, apoyado por músicos como Richard Didymus Washington —congas—, Richard Crooks —batería—, Dave Johnson —bajo—, Gary DeSoto —guitarra— y los cantantes Eleanor Barooshian, Jeanette Jacobs y Sherry Graddie. Una segunda alineación para tocar en la Costa Este de los Estados Unidosincluyó a Doug Hastings a la guitarra y a Don MacAllister a la mandolina.
Con la publicación de The Sun, Moon and Herbs y la participación en el álbum de Eric Clapton y Mick Jagger, Dr. John adquirió una notable reputación. El álbum sirvió para una transición entre el Dr. John psicodélico y un Dr. John más cercano al R&B y al funk de Nueva Orleans. Su siguiente trabajo, Dr. John's Gumbo, acabó derivando en una grabación histórica considerada como uno de sus trabajos más populares.

1972-1974: GumboIn the Right Place y Desitively Bonnaroo[editar]

Junto con Gris-Gris, Dr. John es ampliamente reconocido por sus trabajos publicados entre 1972 y 1974. El álbum de 1972 Dr. John's Gumbo, que abarca varios clásicos del R&B de Nueva Orleans junto a una única composición original, es considerado como una piedra angular en la música de Nueva Orleans. En su autobiografía de 1994, Under a Hoodoo Moon, Dr. John escribió: «En 1972, grabé Gumbo, un álbum que fue tanto un tributo como una interpretación de la música con la que había crecido en los años 40 y 50. Traté de mantener los ligeros cambios característicos en Nueva Orleans mientras trabajaba mi propia guitarra y mi popio piano». El principal sencillo del álbum, Iko Iko, alcanzó los primeros cuarenta puestos de las listas de Billboard. En 2003, Dr. John's Gumbo fue situado en el puesto 402 de la lista de los 500 mejores álkbumes de todos los tiempos elaborada por la revista musical Rolling Stone.
Con Gumbo, Dr. John amplió su trayectoria más allá del vudú psicodélico que había impulsado su carrera desde que se había introducido en el personaje de Dr. John. No fue hasta el álbum de 1998 Anutha Zone cuando Dr. John volvió a concentrarse en el aspecto de la música en su totalidad para un trabajo completo. «Después de grabar un nuevo disco», escribió el músico, «decidí que había tenido suficiente de aquello, de modo que lancé al vertedero la rutina de Gris-Gris y trabajé en un nuevo acto, un Mardi Gras con los clásicos de Nueva Orleans que habíamos versionado en Gumbo».
En 1973, con la producción de Allen Toussaint y el respaldo de The Meters, Dr. John publicó el álbum In the Right Place. En la misma rutina que Dr. John's Gumbo amplió su reputación como músico a la hora de versionar los clásicos de Nueva Orleans, In the Right Place hizo de Dr. John uno de los embajadores del funk de la ciudad. Sobre el álbum, Dr. John escribió: «In the Right Place tiene un mayor sentimiento de dance en comparación con otros que había hecho en el pasado, aunque quedó anclado en el R&B». El álbum alcanzó el puesto 24 en las listas de Billboard, con el sencillo Right Place Wrong Time alzándose hasta el puesto nueve de la lista Billboard Hot 100. Un segundo sencillo, Such a Night, alcanzó el puesto 42.
Dr. John intentó capitalizar el éxito de In the Right Place colaborando nuevamente con Allen Toussaint y The Meters en su nuevo trabajo, Desitively Bonnaroo, publicado en 1974. Similar a In the Right Place, obtuvo un éxito menor en comparación a su predecesor. Desitively Bonnaroo supuso el último álbum de estilo funk hasta la publicación en 1994 de Television, si bien la influencia del vudú y del R&B tradicional de Nueva Orleans, así como el funk, continuó en gran medida apareciendo en sus trabajos, especialmente en sus conciertos.

Trabajos recientes[editar]

Dr. John en el festival Jazz à Vienne en 2006.
A mediados de los años 70, Dr. John comenzó a centrarse en una música más cercana al blues, al R&B y a los clásicos del Tin Pan Alley. Por otra parte, explotó su faceta de músico de sesión, tocando para grupos a lo largo de su carrera como The Rolling Stones en el tema de 1972 «Let It Loose», así como en el dueto de Carly Simon y James TaylorMockingbird en 1974. De forma similar, contribuó a la canción «More and More» para el álbum de Carly Simon Playing Possum. En 1977, coprodujo el álbum de Van Morrison A Period of Transition, donde también tocó los teclados y la guitarra. El 19 de marzo de 1977, Dr. John apareció en el programa de la NBC Saturday Night Live. Posteriormente, salió de gira con Willy DeVille y contribuyó a sus álbumes Return to MagentaVictory MixtureBackstreets of Desire y Big Easy Fantasy.
Dr. John apareció, asimismo, en el documental de Martin Scorsese El último vals —donde se unió a The Band para interpretar su canción «Such a Night», además de en el musical Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, inspirado en The Beatles. En la película Blues Brothers 2000, Dr. John se une a la banda de ficción The Louisiana Gator Boyspara interpretar las canciones «How Blue Can You Get» y «New Orleans». Su versión de la canción «Season of the Witch» fue también incluida en la banda sonora de la película.
En 1982, Dr. John escribió e interpretó la versión cinematográfica de «Cannery Row». En 1993, su canción «Right Place Wrong Time» fue utilizada en la película Dazed and Confused. El mismo año, Dr. John participó en el Franco Folies Festival en La RochelleFrancia. En 1997, apareció en el single benéfico de Lou Reed Perfect Day.
En septiembre de 2005, interpretó el tema de Fats Domino «Walkin' to New Orleans» para cerrar el teletón Shelter from the Storm: A Concert for the Gulf Coast en apoyo de las víctimas del huracán Katrina. En noviembre del mismo año, publicó el EP Sippiana Hericane con el fin de recaudar fondos para la Clínica de Músicos de Nueva Orleans y la Fundación de Jazz de América. El 5 de febrero de 2006, se unió a Aaron NevilleAretha Franklin y a un coro de 150 miembros para cantar el himno nacional de Estados Unidos en la gala de la Super Bowl como tributo a Nueva Orleans. El 8 de febrero de 2006, se unió a Allen ToussaintBonnie RaittThe Edge y Irma Thomas para interpretar «We Can Can» en la ceremonia de clausura de los Premios Grammy de 2006.
En enero de 2008, Dr. John fue incluido en el Salón de la Fama de la Música de Louisiana.
Comenzando con B. B. King in London, del 1971, Dr. John toca en varios discos de B. B. King.

Batalla contra la adicción[editar]

Dr. John tuvo adicción al consumo de heroína. Pero en diciembre de 1989 completó su rehabilitación completa con el auxilio de Narcóticos Anónimos y permaneció libre de adicción el resto de su vida.

Vida privada y muerte[editar]

Dr. John estuvo casado dos ocasiones, mencionando al The New York Times que tenía «muchos» hijos.
El 6 de junio, Dr. John murió de un ataque cardíaco. Su familia anunció la noticia a través de su publicista que había muerto al amanecer de ese día y «El había creado una mezcla única de música la cual había llevado de su hogar en Nueva Orleans, en su corazón la cual estaría siempre en su corazón».

Discografía[editar]

  • Gris-Gris (1968)
  • Babylon (1969)
  • Remedies (1970)
  • The Sun, Moon & Herbs (1971)
  • Dr. John's Gumbo (1972)
  • In The Right Place (1973)
  • Desitively Bonnaroo (1974)
  • Hollywood Be Thy Name (1975)
  • City Lights (1978)
  • Tango Palace (1979)
  • Dr. John Plays Mac Rebennack (1981)
  • The Brightest Smile in Town (1983)
  • Such a Night! Live in London (1984)
  • The Ultimate Dr. John (1987)
  • In a Sentimental Mood (1989)
  • Goin' Back to New Orleans (1992)
  • Television (1994)
  • On a Mardi Gras Day (1994)
  • Afterglow (1995)
  • Trippin' Live (1997)
  • Anutha Zone (1998)
  • Duke Elegant (2000)
  • Funky New Orleans (2000)
  • Creole Moon (2001)
  • All By Hisself: Live at the Lonestar (2003)
  • N'Awlinz: Dis Dat or d'Udda (2004)
  • Live at Montreux, 1995 (2005)
  • Sippiana Hericane (2005)
  • Mercernary (2006) (Blue Note 54541)
  • Right Place, Right Time: Live at Tipitina's - Mardi Gras '89 (2006)
  • The City That Care Forgot (2008)
  • Locked down" (2012)
  • Ske-Dat-De-Dat… The Spirit of Satch" (2014)
  • High Priest of Psychedelic Voodoo" (2015)

Neal Francis






https://www.nealfrancis.com/


“I just wanted to be honest about everything, from my musical influences to my story,” muses Neal Francis. After years of dishonest living—consumed by drugs, alcohol, and addiction—such sincerity is jarring from the 30-year-old Chicago-based musician. Liberated from a self-destructive past and born anew in sobriety, Francis has captured an inspired collection of songs steeped in New Orleans rhythms and Chicago blues. His music evokes a bygone era of R&B’s heyday while simultaneously forging a new path on the musical landscape. Ohio-based Karma Chief Records (a subsidiary of rising soul label Colemine Records) will release two songs, “These Are The Days” and “Changes, Pt. 1,” in early 2019 with the full LP to follow in Fall 2019.
There is a deep connection between Francis’s childhood—his obsession with boogie woogie piano, his father’s gift of a dusty Dr. John LP—and the songs he’s created. The result is an astonishing collection of material without parallel in the contemporary funk and soul scene. The influences are unmistakable: the vocal stylings of Allen Toussaint and Leon Russell; the second line rhythms of The Meters and Dr. John; the barroom rock ‘n’ roll of The Rolling Stones; the gospel soul of Billy Preston; the roots music of The Band. Francis pays tribute to the masters but has his own story to tell: “It’s the life I’ve lived so far.”
And what a life it’s been. Born Neal Francis O’Hara, the piano prodigy found himself touring Europe by the age of 18 with Muddy Waters’ son and backing up other prominent blues artists coast-to-coast. In 2012, Francis joined popular instrumental funk band The Heard. With Francis at the creative helm, The Heard transformed into a national act, touring with boogaloo progenitors The New Mastersounds and chart toppers The Revivalists and appearing at Jazz Fest and Bear Creek. As The Heard’s star rose, however, Francis sunk deeper into addiction. Once a promising sideman, by 2015 he had been fired from his band, evicted from his apartment, and was perilously close to self-destruction. “When you get close to death like that you can feel it,” Francis recalls. An alcohol-induced seizure that year led to a broken femur, dislocated arm, and, finally, the realization that he needed to get clean.
The journey from a hospital bed to launching his solo career was neither predictable nor straightforward. There were musical fits and starts, relapses, and broken relationships. Yet the overwhelming passion driving Francis in this second act has been an overabundance of creative energy. “Drinking held my music in a half-cocked slingshot. I was always so consumed by drugs and alcohol that I didn’t have the time, money, or creative energy to do it. Sobriety let it loose.”
Determined to realize the songs swirling in his head, Francis assembled a crack team of musicians, calling on bassist Mike Starr (The Heard) and drummer PJ Howard (The Revivalists, The Heard). He linked up with producer and analog-obsessive Sergio Rios (Orgone, Cee Lo Green, Alicia Keys) and self-funded a trip to Killion Sound in Los Angeles to record the initial batch of material. “I learned to trust my instincts in that room,” says Francis. Buoyed by classic horn arrangements and Rios’ fierce guitar work, the resulting tracks illuminate a lifetime spent studying the masters of soul music.
From the RMI electra-piano riff that kicks off “She’s A Winner” to the screaming organ swells of “This Time,” Francis and company let it all hang out. This is fun music, dance music. Yet verse after verse and chorus after chorus, Francis wrestles with his past in a straightforward manner: “It’s 5 o’clock in the morning, but I’m not home/ I’m surrounded by people, but I’m really alone.” Like Toussaint and Russell before him he’s married the upbeat rhythms of New Orleans R&B with the lyrical approach of a confessional singer/songwriter. The refrain on “This Time” serves as a foxhole prayer for a better future:  “Let me get it this time/I won’t let you down/Let me get it this time/I won’t fool around.”
2018 was a busy year. In February Francis finished recording basic tracks for the yet-to-be named debut album in Los Angeles and spent the following months doing overdubs in Chicago with engineer Mike Novak (who also recorded demos for the project). After playing his first show in November, Francis was signed by Paradigm Talent Agency. 2019 brought a North American tour supporting The Cat Empire as well as radio play on KEXP, KCRW, and BBC Radio 6. Francis continues to tour relentlessly to promote his own music. “I’m doing this to fulfill a drive within myself, but also to pay tribute to the gifts I’ve been given. And it comes from a place of immense gratitude. I’ve been given so much in my life, especially in the last two years, that this feels like a bonus.”